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Catarina Kinnvall

Catarina Kinnvall

Assistant Head of Department Coordination of Research | Professor

Catarina Kinnvall

Exploring the Populist ‘Mind’: Anxiety, Fantasy, and Everyday Populism

Author

  • Catarina Kinnvall
  • Ted Svensson

Summary, in English

This article is focused on the appeal of far-right populist politics in the everyday and how this appeal is related to continuity and change in the global order. Contemporary societies have witnessed an upsurge of populist movements and groups set on filling a political space by appealing to a population in search of solutions to an ever-changing political and economic landscape. Here, we specifically highlight the role of ontological insecurity, fantasy narratives, and emotional governance as critical for understanding far-right populist politics. The analysis consequently attends to the centrality of gendered and racialised narratives and to how these are fuelled by feelings of pride, shame, vulnerability, and insecurity. The aim is to show how structures and emotions work in tandem to create far-right support and how these developments are similar across Western and non-Western contexts. Particular attention is paid to far-right narratives that pertain to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Department/s

  • Department of Political Science
  • SASNET

Publishing year

2022

Language

English

Pages

526-542

Publication/Series

British Journal of Politics and International Relations

Volume

24

Issue

3

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Topic

  • Political Science

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • emotional governance
  • fantasy narratives
  • far-right
  • gender and race
  • ontological security
  • populism

Status

Published