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Martin Hall

Martin Hall

PhD | Associate Professor | Senior Lecturer

Martin Hall

Rome : Republic, monarchy and empire

Author

  • Torbjørn L. Knutsen
  • Martin Hall

Summary, in English

The Roman Republic expanded and evolved into the Roman Empire. Institutions and impulses from this evolution conditioned nations, shaped states and affected the nature of modern interstate history; indeed, effects of ancient Rome - the Republic as well as the Empire - are still visible in the ordering institutions and in the conflict lines of contemporary International Relations. This chapter, first, sketches the origins and expansion of the Roman Republic, observing that Rome's victory in the Punic Wars set the Republic on the road to Empire. Next, the chapter indicates the contours of a vast literature that addresses Roman expansionism, before it identifies a 'military-agricultural complex' as both a main driving force of Republican expansionism and a solvent of the Republican system of government. Finally, the chapter discusses the lingering impact of Rome on law, politics, religion and education of the Great Powers in general and the United States in particular. The history of the Roman Empire adds contrast depth to the study of interstate relations.

Department/s

  • Department of Political Science

Publishing year

2021-06-29

Language

English

Pages

398-407

Publication/Series

Routledge Handbook of Historical International Relations

Document type

Book chapter

Publisher

Routledge

Topic

  • Political Science

Status

Published

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISBN: 9781351168953
  • ISBN: 9781351168960