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Photo of Karin Aggestam. Photo.

Karin Aggestam

Professor, Director

Photo of Karin Aggestam. Photo.

From Theory to Practice. Temporary International Presence in Hebron

Author

  • Karin Aggestam

Summary, in English

This article examines the role of third parties in asymmetric conflicts and international peacekeeping in theory and practice. Various theoretical conceptualisations of peacekeeping are critically discussed and linked to conflict and negotiation theory. It argues that peacekeeping is a broad, transformative and context-dependent notion, highlighted by alterable meanings of impartiality, use of force, timing, consent and mandate. Based on the author's practice of peacekeeping, an empirical analysis of TIPH is made. It concludes that the mission comprises modes of traditional and multi-functional peacekeeping, whilst the mandate is based on a bilateral agreement that primarily focuses on addressing the asymmetry of power between the negotiating parties.

Department/s

  • Department of Political Science

Publishing year

2001

Language

English

Pages

53-69

Publication/Series

Cambridge Review of International Affairs

Volume

14

Issue

2

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Topic

  • Political Science

Keywords

  • Internationell politik

Status

Published

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 0955-7571